Conference on the Origins of Political Economy

Volume: 

37:1

Conference: 

The Origins of Political Economy

The 37.1 issue of Social Philosophy & Policy focuses on the origins of political economy.

In recent years, a reunification of economics and politics has emerged as a key trend in social scientific research. The “public choice” school and the “new institutional economics” movement have made seminal contributions to the rediscovery of political economy in social philosophy and policy. The scholars at the forefront of these developments were responding to a widespread acknowledgment that solving many of our most pressing public challenges requires a reintegration of the moral sciences. Their attempt to rise to this challenge, alongside the multiple research programs that were elaborated between the middle of the eighteenth century and the end of the twentieth century, provide a rich set of perspectives from which we might examine the emergence and re-emergence of political economy, its sources and motivations, and the problems it sought to solve.

By bringing together scholars and luminaries in philosophy, economics and political theory, we hope to create a productive and stimulating weekend. Papers from this conference will be featured in the summer 2020 issue of Social Philosophy & Policy.

Our distinguished list of authors include:

  • Christopher Berry, Professor Emeritus of Political Theory and Honorary Professorial Research Fellow, University of Glasgow
  • Richard Boyd, Associate Professor of Government, Georgetown
  • Matthew Brown, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, University of Illinois, Springfield
  • Michael Gill, Professor of Philosophy, University of Arizona
  • Natalie Gold, Senior Research Fellow, Oxford University
  • Shaun Hargreaves Heap, Professor of Political Economy, King's College London
  • James Harris, Professor of History of Philosophy, University of St. Andrews
  • Daniel Jacobson, Professor of Philosophy, University of Michigan
  • Leonidas Montes, Director, Centro de Estudios Públicos; Professor of Economics, Adolfo Ibáñez University
  • James Otteson, Thomas W. Smith Presidential Chair in Business Ethics, Professor of Economics, and Executive Director of the Eudaimonia Institute, Wake Forest University
  • Maria Pia Paganelli, Associate Professor of Economics, Trinity University
  • Margaret Schabas, Professor of Philosophy, University of British Columbia