FC Talks

Dr. Andrew Foster, Ghana and the Roots of Deaf Education in Africa

Joel Runnels is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Freedom Center and Fulbright Specialist at the University of Ghana’s Department of Linguistics.

This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. Dec. 3, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 13:54

Why Traditional Public Schools Undervalue Intelligence, and How School Choice Could Change That

FC Talks presents Robert Maranto is Endowed Chair in Education Leadership and Professor of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas.

Abstract: I’ll discuss some of the ironies of American education. Why have four decades of public education reform underperformed? Why do education majors tend to have lower standardized test scores than other undergraduates? And why did a libertarian leaning, union-skeptical Republican elected to school board in a progressive college town ally with the local teacher union against administration? The answer to each question is that k-12 public schools, and increasingly colleges, do not exist to educate students. To explain why, I’ll summarize the history of U.S. education as a field, and how that history shapes today’s k-12 schools, and increasingly colleges. Importantly, our weak educational systems increasingly undermine our strong constitutional systems via political correctness. I’ll end with ideas for reform.

This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. Nov. 19, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Friday, November 20, 2020 - 09:54

Instructional Quality: The Most Important and Most Neglected Issue on Campus

Harry Brighouse is the Mildred Fish Harnack Professor of Philosophy and Carol Dickson Bascom Professor of the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is one of the most well-known contemporary philosophers of education and also directs the Center for Ethics and Education. His books include On Education (Routledge) and School Choice and Social Justice (Oxford University Press). In his FC Talk, Professor Brighouse will examine instructional quality as an equity issue on college campuses. Arguably, high quality instruction and mentoring is particularly important for students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Abstract: How good is our undergraduate teaching? And how equally are its benefits spread? I argue that our undergraduate teaching (including mine, and, probably, yours) is suboptimal. And I argue that, whereas everyone (including people who never even attend college) is made worse off by its suboptimality, it is particularly bad for students who are already disadvantaged. This makes undergraduate instruction a serious equity issue. Fortunately, it can be addressed by administrators, departments, and individual instructors, and I will make some useful suggestions.

This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz.

When

2 p.m. to 3:20 p.m. Oct. 29, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Friday, October 30, 2020 - 09:49

Polarization, Civic Dialogue, and the Boundaries of Open Expression

Current struggles over the meaning of 'truth' and 'safety' help explain why college campuses have become key battle grounds in the culture wars. While campus speech struggles are not new, their terrain has been shifting, and recent challenges on campuses are typical of the current hyper-partisan and polarized political sphere. Inside the classroom and beyond it, charges of censorship, demands for civility and adherence to unspoken rules, debates about the legitimacy of protests, and concerns about silencing, proliferate. College campuses, long seen as labs for democracy, now serve as flashpoints in a social struggle over the future of democracy. Recent tensions around ‘cancel culture’ reflect ongoing disagreement over the boundaries of expression, raising questions about who should be allowed to speak, and what might never be said. It presents an expansion of earlier ‘de-platforming’ attempts on college campuses, and provides an opportunity to consider key matters of civility, resistance, and the possibility of a common ground. 

Sigal Ben-Porath is a Professor of Education, Political Science and Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. 

This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. Oct. 22, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Friday, October 23, 2020 - 14:24

What Should a Teacher Believe?

Jennifer Morton is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Ethics and Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She works in philosophy of education, philosophy of action, moral philosophy, and political philosophy, and her work in the philosophy of education was awarded the American Philosophical Association’s Scheffler Prize. Her first book, Moving Up Without Losing Your Way: The Ethical Costs of Upward Mobility, just appeared with Princeton University Press. In her FC talk, she is going to discuss what teachers in high-poverty contexts should believe about their students' potential. 

This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz.

When

Noon to 1:20 p.m. Oct. 8, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Friday, October 9, 2020 - 14:14

Children of the Broken Heartlands: Rural Isolation and the Geography of Opportunity

This talk identifies rural isolation as a barrier to rural children’s access to civic or relational equality in the larger society beyond their rural towns. It identifies physical separation, cultural distance, and failures of respect and understanding as defining aspects of rural isolation that make it analogous to de facto racial isolation as it was understood in the era of U.S. civil rights legislation and efforts to racially integrate public schools. These dimensions of rural isolation are examined in the context of an evolving geography of opportunity, characterized by an increasing concentration of economic activity, high-status occupations, and educational and social pathways to middle class status in cities. The talk concludes by considering some ways in which the civic equality of rural children might be promoted.

Randall Curren is a Professor of Philosophy and Education and Chair of the Philosophy Department at the University of Rochester. His work spans multiple areas of philosophy, including philosophy of education as well as ancient, political, and moral philosophy. His recent books include Patriotic Education in a Global Age (University of Chicago Press) and Living Well Now and in the Future: Why Sustainability Matters(MIT Press). 

This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. Sept. 24, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Friday, September 25, 2020 - 14:05

Defending Education: A Democratic Role for Courts in Education Policy

What role (if any) should courts play in education policy within a democratic society? In the United States, there are significant and persistent gaps in education funding between the richest and the poorest school districts. In response, some have argued that state and federal courts should hold legislatures accountable for meeting their educational promises to the most vulnerable public-school students. Some, like the Washington Supreme Court, have gone so far as to fine the legislature $100,000 a day until it passes a satisfactory education funding law. This paper examines the legitimacy and desirability of these legal actions from a democratic perspective, assessing the democratic benefits and costs of court action. 

Alexandra Oprea is a Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at Australian National University who specializes in political philosophy and PPE. Her interests include democracy, distribution, and education, and her research often engages with the work of Rousseau.

This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz. 

When

2:30 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. Sept. 17, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Friday, September 18, 2020 - 13:53

The Cult of Smart

In the latter half of the 20th century, the American economy changed. The job market for those without a college degree collapsed. Correspondingly, the cultural obsession with education grew, with more and more pressure falling on our young people to excel academically. The policy apparatus now saw education as the only tool to increase equality. But as the number of post-high school degrees expanded ever higher, working-age poverty barely fell, and inequality grew. Meanwhile the relentless pressure to succeed academically ran up against an immovable barrier: the fact that different individual students have profoundly different levels of baseline academic talent. The result is a system that leaves millions behind while telling them that it’s their own fault, and where our public school systems are under constant attack. Can we fix this? Can we create a more realistic, more equitable system? Can we destroy the Cult of Smart? In this talk, Dr. Fredrik deBoer will argue that we can and why we should.


This talk will be hosted on Zoom. For more information, please email Lucy Schwarz.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. Sept. 10, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Friday, September 18, 2020 - 13:05

The Imaginative Conservative

What can an appealing conservatism look like in the 21st century? Bradley is a Professor of History and the Russell Amos Kirk Chair in American Studies at Hillsdale College. He is also co-founder and editor-at-large of the online journal The Imaginative Conservative. Please RSVP in case you plan to join us for this exciting talk.

Abstract: This talk will cover a few things. First, I will offer an examination of the idea of imagination within non-leftist thought. I will also talk about the various schools of thought that went into the creation of conservatism (ca. 1950) and what remains in 2020. Finally, I will address the concept of the dignity and uniqueness of each human person—the thing that most needs conserving.

The talk will be hosted on Zoom. Please contact Lucy Schwarz for more information.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. Aug. 27, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Monday, September 7, 2020 - 08:54

Some Evidence on the Effects of Rape Culture on Rape and Public Attitudes Toward it

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 FC Talks Series presents Matthew Baum, Harvard University.

Matthew Baum is the Marvin Kalb Professor of Global Communications and a Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. His research focuses on American foreign policy as well as on the role of mass media and public opinion in contemporary American politics. In his recent work, some of which he will present to us, he empirically investigates the effects of "rape culture" in America.

This talk will be hosted on zoom by Lucy Schwarz. Please contact Lucy for details if you are interested in attending.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. June 11, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 13:33
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