FC Talks

Some Evidence on the Effects of Rape Culture on Rape and Public Attitudes Toward it

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 FC Talks Series presents Matthew Baum, Harvard University.

Matthew Baum is the Marvin Kalb Professor of Global Communications and a Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. His research focuses on American foreign policy as well as on the role of mass media and public opinion in contemporary American politics. In his recent work, some of which he will present to us, he empirically investigates the effects of "rape culture" in America.

This talk will be hosted on zoom by Lucy Schwarz. Please contact Lucy for details if you are interested in attending.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. June 11, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 13:33

The Varieties of Ironic Experience

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 FC Talks Series presents Roger Kreuz (University of Memphis).

Roger Kreuz is an Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Memphis and a Professor in the University's Psychology Department. He works mainly in experimental psychology, cognitive psychology, and psychology of language. Many of his publications focus on the phenomenon of irony. What does it mean to refer to a person, a statement, or a situation as ironic? Attend Professor Kreuz's talk and you shall find out.

This talk will be hosted on zoom by Lucy Schwarz. Please contact Lucy for details if you are interested in attending.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. June 4, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 13:30

Post-Truth, False Balance and Virtuous Gatekeeping

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 Colloquium Series presents Alfred Archer, Assistant Professor in Philosophy at the Tilburg Centre for Logic, Ethics, and Philosophy of Science at Tilburg University. He works primarily in moral and social philosophy, the philosophy of sport, and applied ethics, and he tries bringing philosophy to the public. He will address the dangers of false balance or "bothsideism" in journalism and argue that this practice has a significant role to play in bringing about a "post truth" environment.

This talk will be hosted on zoom by Lucy Schwarz. Please contact Lucy for details if you are interested in attending.

When

11:30 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. May 21, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 13:24

The Timing Problem is Not a Problem

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 Colloquium Series presents Travis Timmerman, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Seton Hall University.

Travis Timmerman's primary research interests are in normative ethics, animal welfare, global poverty, and the philosophy of death. In his FC Talk, he is going to address the puzzling question, "If death is bad for a person, at what time is it bad for them?"

This talk will be hosted on zoom by Lucy Schwarz. Please contact Lucy for details if you are interested in attending.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. May 14, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Monday, April 20, 2020 - 17:12

Mass Incarceration and Poverty

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 Colloquium Series presents Chris Surprenant, Professor of Philosophy at the University of New Orleans.

Chris Surprenant is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of New Orleans and the Founding Director of the University's Urban Entrepreneurship & Policy Institute. He works in ethics and political philosophy, with a focus on the connection between entrepreneurship and human well-being, the importance of free exchange to the proper functioning of a free society, and the role of financial incentives in shaping institutions and influencing public policy.

This talk will be hosted on zoom by Lucy Schwarz. Please contact Lucy for details if you are interested in attending.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. April 23, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Monday, April 20, 2020 - 17:08

Baron von Richthofen’s Account of Consent and the Puzzle of Non-Equilibrium Goods

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 Colloquium Series presents James Stacey Taylor, Associate Professor of Philosophy at the College of New Jersey.

ABSTRACT:

In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the question of where the limits of markets lie. This discussion has recently focused on two distinct questions: (1) which goods cannot be bought and sold, and (2) which goods should not be bought and sold. But the recent emphasis on asking which goods should not be bought and sold might be misplaced, for very few critics of markets believe that there are goods or services that are essentially market inalienable. Instead, the discussion over the moral limits of markets should be a discussion over the moral limits of voluntary exchange. That is, it should identify conditions under which an exchange—even an exchange that appears to be voluntary on the part of those party to it—is morally impermissible.
 
In this paper I outline one way in which apparently voluntary exchanges are morally impermissible: That one party to them does not fully consent to the exchange in question even if she might consent to it as she believes that she will be made better off by it. I then outline a “tri-decker” account of consent that is needed for a person to fully consent to an exchange. With this in hand I will note that a failure to pass this tri-decker test for legitimate consent will (typically) be limited to exchanges of certain goods: Those whose prices cannot adjust as a result of signaling to buyers or sellers to enter the market to achieve market equilibrium. We thus have reason to believe that markets in goods of this sort—non-equilibrium goods—are prima facie impermissible.
 
This talk will be hosted on zoom by Lucy Schwarz. Please contact Lucy for details if you are interested in attending.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. April 9, 2020

Event Contacts

Digital Signage Date

Monday, April 20, 2020 - 16:57

Urban Planning and Urban Values

The Freedom Center is going to host a talk by Sanford Ikeda this upcoming Tuesday, March 10, on the relationship between urban planning and ethics. Sandy is a Professor of Economics at Purchase College, SUNY.

ABSTRACT: The renowned urbanist Jane Jacobs famously argues that urban planning that fails to appreciate how the design of public spaces influences human behavior can cause the death of cities, specifically when planners are insensitive to how interventions into the built environment systematically change the way people interact with one another. Interpreting Jacobs’s argument in terms of the impact of planning on the values that enable cooperation among strangers in a living city can contribute to our understanding of the relationship between urbanism and ethics.

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community.

When

12:30 p.m. March 10, 2020

Where

Kendrick Room, Social Sciences 128

Digital Signage Date

Monday, March 23, 2020 - 15:58

Offensiphobia

Thursday, March 5th

12:30-1:45pm

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 colloquium series presents Angelo Corlett, Professor of Philosophy San Diego State University.

We are happy to host another U of A Philosophy alumnus this semester! Angelo Corlett studied under Joel Feinberg, Keith Lehrer, Alvin Goldman, and John Pollock, and he earned his PhD here in 1992. He is now Professor of Philosophy and Ethics at San Diego State University. Professor Corlett works on a host of fascinating issues, such as racism, apology, forgiveness, responsibility, punishment, and social knowledge. He is also the editor-in-chief of The Journal of Ethics . Professor Corlett's talk will criticize "offensiphobia", i.e., the belief that academic freedom ought to be censored because of the mere offensiveness of certain kinds of expressions.

 

Abstract:

Offensiphobia is the widespread belief that offensive expressions ought to be prohibited and the movement to prohibit them. While offensive expressions, including hateful ones, are protected by established First Amendment law, there are a cluster of related moral arguments which render offensiphobia highly problematic. So offensiphobia, a movement which is prevalent throughout the United States of America, has inadequate grounding and must be rejected as it seeks to, or actually does, violate freedom of expression rights, especially in higher educational contexts.  

 

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. March 5, 2020

Academic year

2019-2020

Semester

Spring

Where

Kendrick Seminar Room, Social Sciences 128

Rediscovering Moral Science

Thursday, Febuary 20th

12:30-1:45pm

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 Colloquium Series presents David Schmidtz, Kendrick Professor of Philosophy at the University of Arizona.

Our own Dave Schmidtz is on the program this Spring! Dave is the Kendrick Professor of Philosophy here at the U of A, founder of the Freedom Center, Eller Chair of Service-Dominant Logic in the Eller College of Management, and editor-in-chief of Social Philosophy & Policy. Check out this fun profile of Dave, which gives some background on his extraordinary career path. Dave is a leading expert in political philosophy, political economy, and environmental ethics, among other subjects (although his work is never *just* about one narrow subject but always about the bigger picture). Dave's work has been translated into 14 different languages.

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Feb. 20, 2020

Academic year

2019-2020

Where

Kendrick Seminar Room, Social Sciences 128

Poverty, the Spirit, and the History of Art

Thursday, January 23
12:30-1:45pm

The Freedom Center Spring 2020 Colloquium Series presents Robert Gordon, Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Arizona.

Robert Gordon is an Assistant Professor at the Fred Fox School of Music here at the U of A, and a Fellow at the University's Center for Buddhist Studies. He is also the Program Manager of the American Culture & Ideas Initiative, which promotes academic and public engagement with the aesthetic, philosophical, economic, and historical foundations of American society. Professor Gordon's research focuses, among other things, on Eastern art and philosophy, art and economics, and freedom and its relationship to the fine arts.

Abstract:
The problem of poverty continues to be a perennial one for civil societies around the globe. It has been addressed by sociologists, political scientists, philosophers, theologians and spiritual leaders, artists, economists, and many others. The issue is both a material and spiritual one, impacting one’s financial and psychological well-being. Yet, can aesthetic considerations play any role in better understanding the challenge of poverty in the world? This talk considers the extent to which the history of art can contribute to the ongoing dialogue. It explores various areas where art historical ideas intersect with current notions surrounding the topic of poverty. It maintains that the history of art can provide valuable insights into the subject, even as its goal is not to seek a final solution to the problem. Is it pretentious or vain for the realm of high culture to think that it can say anything of value to those experiencing the lowest strata of material subsistence, in all its hopelessness and despair? You may decide.

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Jan. 23, 2020

Academic year

2019-2020

Semester

Spring

Where

Kendrick Seminar Room, Social Sciences 128
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