2018-2019

The Voices of Culture Lecture Series is co-sponsored by The Center for the Philosophy of Freedom and The American Culture and Ideas Initiative.

This lecture series brings a variety of cultural commentators and scholars to the University of Arizona. The 2018-2019 series brings speakers ranging from well known journalists to Harvard professors.

October 29-30, 2018
5:15 pm – ILC 120 – University of Arizona Campus
Eric Gibson is editor of the Leisure & Arts page of The Wall Street Journal. He was formerly
the executive editor of ARTnews and art critic for the Washington Times.

January 23, 2019
5:00 pm – Gallagher Theatre – University of Arizona Campus
Arthur C. Brooks is an American social scientist, musician, and columnist for The New York
Times. He is the president of the American Enterprise Institute.

February 21, 2019
5:00 pm – CCP 108 – Center for Creative Photography – University of Arizona Campus
Harvey C. Mansfield is the William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of Government at Harvard.
April 3, 2019
5:00 pm – Music Bldg. Room 146 – University of Arizona Campus
Danielle Allen is the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, and
Director of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When

11:21 a.m. Sept. 3, 2018

Academic year

2018-2019

Varieties of Deep Disagreement

Thu, 4/25 - 12:30 to 13:45

Location: Social Sciences 128

Abstract: Deep disagreement gained increasing attention in epistemology in the last years. Intuitively, deep disagreement arises if two parties fail to reach agreement about certain target propositions due to disagreement about fundamental “hinge” propositions and/or framework propositions about rules or conditions of rational argumentation. This paper will clarify two central questions concerning deep disagreement. First, it will elucidate the nature of deep disagreement by providing a taxonomy of various versions of deep disagreement, including deep disagreement relying on disagreement about the reliability of sources, on disagreement about premises of arguments and on disagreement about the rationality (or cogency) of arguments. Second, it provides arguments for why these versions of deep disagreement cannot be resolved via argumentation, which are based on reinterpretations of skeptical arguments.

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. April 25, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

The Future of Public Reason: Consensus, Convergence and Beyond

Keynote Speakers:
Gerald Gaus, University of Arizona
Stephen Macedo, Princeton University

Conference Theme:
This conference aims to bring together leading scholars in contemporary theories of public reason to explore questions surrounding liberalism in diverse settings. Our intention is to bring together a dynamic group of theorists to explore new avenues of research in public reason with the aim of promoting a productive dialogue between what are often taken to be competing factions in the public reason debate. We hope that dialogue among theorists of different bents leads to productive developments in theories of public reason, with the aim of taking the debate beyond the well-worn (though not necessarily unimportant) debates over the structure of public reason that currently occupy much of the literature.

Fundamental to the public reason liberalism project is the insight that deep diversity is the natural and permanent result of liberal institutions, and that the acknowledgement of such diversity requires, at times quite radical, revision to the way political theory has been done. This conference thus hopes to take steps in advancing political theory in diverse contexts, taking as its guiding framework public reason liberalism.

Conference Website:
http://publicreason2019.com/

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community.

When

10:31 a.m. March 18, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

Where

Maloney Seminar Room, Social Sciences 224

Topic: Blame and responsibility in morals and elsewhere

Thu, 4/11 - 12:30 to 13:45

Location: Social Sciences 128

Abstract: We blame ourselves and others on moral grounds as well as in relation to a wide range of non-moral norms and values, including those of sports, crafts, engineering, nursing, logic, and belief formation. In this talk, I expand on and deepen my earlier attempts to offer completely general accounts of responsibility and blame, and use lessons from non-moral domains to address problems for accounts of moral responsibility and moral blameworthiness.

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. April 11, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

Where

Soc. Sci. 128

Bringing Knowledge to Market: The evolution and broader significance of Israeli economic and scientific policies spanning the civilian and military sectors

Tues., 2/19 - 12:30 to 13:45

Location: Kendrick Room

Abstract: One constant in Israeli history is the reliance on the production and exploitation of scientific knowledge for both economic growth and military superiority. Beneath this constant, however, lie profound shifts in government policies, especially those facilitating increasingly porous flows of people and ideas between the civilian and military sectors. Today, where high-tech companies are often founded by former members of the once most-hidden agencies of the defense establishment, the global market saturates virtually all walks of Israeli life. Positive and negative consequences of such developments are examined with a view to their relevance well beyond Israel.  

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. Feb. 19, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

Reflective sentimentalism in Aesthetics: Hume’s Question and Kant’s Answer

Thu, 3/28 - 12:30 to 13:45

Location: Social Sciences 128

Abstract: ‘Beauty’ is an evaluative predicate; the evaluation of an object as beautiful or not is constituted by an aesthetic sentiment. But not all the sentiments that people have in response to a particular object of perception can support an aesthetic judgment all other people have reason to agree with. Only proper aesthetic sentiments can do so. Aesthetic judgments which are well-grounded are based on proper aesthetic sentiments – and vice versa. The challenge for the philosopher is to explain in virtue of what a sentiment is aesthetically proper without merely moving in a circle. Both Hume and Kant tried to meet this challenge, but they did so in different ways. And my claim is that only Kant did so successfully.

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. March 28, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

Where

Soc. Sci. 128

An Institutional Investigation of the Farm-Supply Chain Interface

Thu, 2/7 - 12:30 to 13:45

Location: Social Sciences 128

Abstract: The beginning of the supply chain is increasingly in the forefront of today’s headlines on topics such as social responsibility, environmental sustainability, traceability, and food safety.  Indeed, decisions made by actors in the raw materials echelon, particularly farmers, have lasting and amplified impacts that promulgate the entire supply chain. Yet little is known about the factors that shape farmers’ decisions and willingness to engage with the supply chain. Our study begins to fill this important gap by delving into the minds of farmers to explicate the individual and institutional factors operating in the farm-supply chain interface. Using an interpretive research approach, we elaborate middle-range theory to identify micro-, meso-, and macro-level institutional mechanisms that are specific to the farm context and explain how these mechanisms interact to shape farmers’ willingness to engage with the supply chain. The middle-range theory elaborated in our study offers important implications for theory, supply chain practice, and public policy amidst increased consumer demands for a farm-to-fork experience.  

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community. RSVP to Lucy Schwarz at luciaschwarz@email.arizona.edu.

When

12:30 p.m. Feb. 7, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

Where

Soc. Sci. 128

Devaluing Importance

Thu, 1/31 - 12:30 to 13:45

Location: Social Sciences 128

Abstract: It is widely thought that we have good reasons to do important things with our lives, or to become important people.  These reasons go beyond impersonal considerations, such as the moral obligation one might have to cure a terrible illness, for example.  Being important is also thought to be something worth striving for out of self-interest; an especially significant life is something worth wanting for oneself.  Although this kind of judgment is widespread, and although it often makes brief appearances in philosophy, it has not received sustained, systematic examination.  And I will argue that it is mistaken: from the perspective of what's in our self-interest, we have no good reason to be important. In fact, being unimportant (while still mattering to a degree) comes with a valuable kind of liberation.

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community.

When

12:30 p.m. Jan. 31, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

Where

Soc. Sci. 128

Veganism and Making a Difference

Thu, 1/24 - 12:30 to 13:45

Location: Social Sciences 128

Abstract: Veganism, the practice of eschewing the consumption of all animal products, is often championed as a way of reducing the amount of animal suffering in the world. But many philosophers (e.g. Budolfson 2015; McPherson 2015, 2018) have put pressure on the claim that individual food choices can have such an impact. These philosophers then go on to build a moral case for veganism and vegetarianism in terms of complicity with wrongdoing (McPherson 2015, 2018) and the essentiality of harm (Budolfson 2015). In this paper, I'd like to grant that individual food choices cannot directly affect the number of animals raised and killed within the factory farming system, but that it can play an important role in making a difference to the amount of animal suffering in the world in other ways. But as we'll see, the ways in which veganism can contribute to the reduction of animal suffering is a highly contingent matter. One can contribute to the reduction of animal suffering without adopting veganism and one can be vegan without contributing to the reduction of animal suffering. By reflecting on how precisely veganism relates to the reduction of animal suffering, I hope to get clear on the better (and worse) ways to be vegan. 

We welcome faculty, students, and staff of the Philosophy and Moral Science Departments as well as members of the wider University community.

When

12:30 p.m. Jan. 24, 2019

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Spring

Where

Soc. Sci. 128

A talk by Eric Gibson, the Arts in Review editor of The Wall Street Journal, is presented by the Center for the Philosophy of Freedom in conjunction with the American Culture & Ideas Initiative.

Where: The Tucson Museum of Art 140 N Main Ave
When: Monday Octopber 29th 6:00PM

Eric Gibson is the arts in review editor of The Wall Street Journal, overseeing the opinion side of the paper’s cultural coverage—its criticism of the fine arts, television, movies, theater and the many forms of popular music. He also writes art exhibition reviews and op-eds on issues in the world of museums.

When

6 p.m. Oct. 29, 2018

Academic year

2018-2019

Semester

Fall

Where

Tucson Museum of Art
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