2012-2013

At 1:00pm on Wednesday, May 1st, Miranda Spieler will be giving a talk entitled, "Was There Ever a French 'Free Soil' Principle? Slavery and the Remaking of the French Legal Order at the End of the Old Regime," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Miranda teaches here at the University of Arizona in the Department of History. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Miranda's talk!

When

1 p.m. to 3 p.m. May 1, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On April 17th, Suzanne Dovi will be giving a talk entitled, "Rethinking Marginalization:Changing How We Measure Representation," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Suzanne teaches here at the University of Arizona in the School of Government and Public Policy. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Suzanne's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. April 17, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

On April 4th, Rachana Kamtekar will be leading a session entitled, "Getting Ready for the Job Market," as part of the Freedom Center's professional development seminar series. Rachana will be speaking for half an hour, with 45 minutes of Q&A to follow. Please join us in the Kendrick Room of the Freedom Center for Rachana's session!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. April 4, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

On February 14th, Michael McKenna will be leading a session entitled, "Publishing in Philosophy," as part of the Freedom Center's professional development seminar series. Michael will be speaking for half an hour, with 45 minutes of Q&A to follow. Please join us in the Kendrick Room of the Freedom Center for Michael's session!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 14, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On February 28th, Keith Lehrer will be giving a talk entitled, "Thomas Reid on the Moral Faculty and the Truth of Moral Judgment," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Keith is a Regents Professor of Philosophy (Emeritus) here at the University of Arizona. Here is an abstract for the talk:

"Reid argued that we have a moral faculty that yields moral judgment of an action in response to how we conceive of it. His theory allows us to explain how people who have the same moral faculty, an innate capacity, may differ in moral judgments. His nominalism allows him to argue that moral judgments are objectively true in the same way that perceptual judgments of color are objectively true without assuming the existence of moral properties or color properties. The objective bases are individual qualities of experience. Though the moral faculty is an innate capacity, our moral conceptions are not innate ideas but rather develop from relative and obscure conceptions to clear and distinct ones governed by moral principles. Our faculties are governed by first principles, Reid argued, and are tuned to truth, though not infallible. They are trustworthy and not fallacious in in discerning truth from error."

Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Keith's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 28, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On January 14th, Aryeh Tepper will be giving a talk as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series, in collaboration with the Arizona Center for Judaic Studies. Aryeh is a visiting scholar with The Tikvah Fellowship and a contributing writer for Jewish Ideas Daily. Here is an abstract:

The title of this lecture, “The Problematic Power of Music: A Jewish View," might sound strange to many ears. What exactly is the problem? With an MP3 file in hand there’s no limit to when and where you can commune with the muse. And when the headphones come off, music is the background sound that soothes you while you're put on hold and the beat that moves you while you shop. You like what you like, and I like what I like, so what’s the problem?

But a little reflection should help us remember that music is a mysterious thing. Play the right song and you can stimulate a man to make love, or war - and sometimes the love is adulterous while the war is just. Music holds out the promise of marrying the rational and passionate parts of our soul and fashioning a harmonious personality, but it can also damn the voice of reason and, in a romantic swirl of emotion, supply the soundtrack for murder. Music is, in other words, a power, and a very ambiguous power at that.

In this lecture I examine the Bible’s two-fold teaching regarding music’s ambiguous power. The lecture will begin with a general philosophical discussion of the problem and then continue with two sections in which the Bible’s two-fold approach to the problem is examined. Within each section, the Biblical view is deepened through philosophical, theological, and literary variations on, and illustrations of, the original Biblical principles. I will conclude the lecture by exploring the limits of the Biblical teaching.

Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Aryeh's talk!

When

Noon to 1 p.m. Jan. 14, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

Department of Philosophy and Center for the Philosophy of Freedom

University of Arizona

Social Sciences Building, Room 224

February 15-16, 2013

Friday, February 15

3:00 - 5:00            Dana Kay Nelkin, University of California, San Diego

                                         "Psychopaths, Incorrigible Racists, and Kinds of Responsibility"

                                Chair:  Chad van Schoelandt

Saturday, February 16

9:30 – 11:30        Derk Pereboom, Cornell University

                                        "Free Will Skepticism, Blame, and Obligation"

                                Chair:  Yael Lowenstein

11:30 – 1:00        Lunch

1:00 – 3:00           Gunnar Bjornsson, Umea University, University of Gothenburg

                                        “Ignorance, responsibility, and the attraction of conscious control”

                                Chair: Hannah Tierney

3:15 – 5:15           Manuel Vargas, University of San Francisco                        

                                        “Negligence, Reasons, Responsibility”

                                Chair: Brandon Warmke

For questions, contact the conference organizer, Michael McKenna, at msmckenna63@gmail.com.

When

3 p.m. Feb. 15, 2013 to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 16, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On January 8th, Carla Bagnoli will be giving a talk as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Carla teaches philosophy at the University of Modena & Reggio Emilia. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Carla's talk!

When

Noon to 1:30 p.m. Jan. 8, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On February 7th, Fred Miller will be giving a talk as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Fred teaches philosophy at Bowling Green State University, where he is also the executive director of the Social Philosophy and Policy Center. Fred is also a research professor at the Freedom Center. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Fred's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 7, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On March 28th, James Otteson will be giving a talk entitled, "Justice, Social Justice, and Ultimate Justice in Adam Smith," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. James teaches philosophy and economics at Yeshiva University and is co-chair of the Department of Philosophy. Here is an abstract for the talk:

"Adam Smith's 'negative' conception of 'justice' seems rather thin, apparently disallowing positive duties toward others that some conceptions of 'social justice,' for example, wish to incorporate into 'justice.' Smith offers reasons in defense of his 'thin' conception, but do they justify the position? In this talk I will lay out Smith's position, present his reasons for preferring it, and then raise and evaluate some 'social justice'-related objections to it. I will then offer an interpretation of Smithian 'ultimate justice' that would address remaining social-justice worries."

Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for James' talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. March 28, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring
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