2012-2013

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On March 19th, Juhana Lemetti will be giving a talk entitled, "Law-Abiding Citizens?: Manners and Toleration in Hobbesian Political Theory," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Juhana is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki in the Philosophical Psychology, Morality, and Politics Research Unit. Here is an abstract for the talk:

"Obedience is considered the primary and sole virtue of Hobbesian citizens. As long as the sovereign protects citizens they are supposed obey its orders. This tying up of legitimacy of the supreme power and protection give the well-known absolutist flavour to Hobbes and Hobbesian political theory that has been, despite all the criticisms from the very beginning, so successful in and formative to the modern western political order. When to this is added that the sovereign simply does not hold the supreme and unlimited power in a commonwealth but more importantly the power to interpret its own commands (laws), the result is a bleakish vision of tyranny. No critique or resistance is justified in Hobbesian commonwealth and its citizen could be considered as puppets. The received view, perhaps best articulated by Philip Pettit and Quentin Skinner, rightly points out the soft underbelly of Hobbesian tradition: no genuine political liberty is possible in this political architectonics.

"It seems absurd that a person with such political imagination and wit as Hobbes would not have understood this consequence of his political theory. In this paper, I seek to re-think Hobbesian political theory by focusing our attention on the intermediate layer of this theory, that is, on Hobbes’s social psychology as outlined in Chapter 11 of Leviathan (and the corresponding chapter in De Homine). In the former Hobbes characterises manners as follows “those qualities of man-kind, that concern their living together in Peace, and Unity.” First, I shall explicate what is the role of individual temperance of passions and what is the role of interaction in the formation of manners. After this I will analyze manners as the causes of social cohesion and conflict.

"Manners, it is suggested, play a further function in Hobbesian political theory. As is well known, Hobbes remains quite silent about the specific contents of natural laws and, more importantly, what ends we should seek in our lives. Though peace, security and commodious living are something that all human kind should aim at, what these general ends concretely mean differs in time and place. Hobbes then seems to suggest that there is no single end, but many ends that societies, groups and individuals seek in this life. All this is rather axiomatic for us, but, I shall conclude, it is this pluralism and toleration of the different values and ways of life, that is Hobbes’s lasting legacy for liberalism but in order to understand exactly how, we need a more careful analyze of his conception of manners."

Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Juhana's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. March 19, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On February 21st, David Keyt will be giving a talk entitled, "Aristotle and the Joy of Working," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. David is an Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Washington. Here is an abstract for the talk:

"Aristotle's principles are usually sound, though he often misapplies them. In ethical and political philosophy two principles of his that I believe are sound (or at least highly defensible) are (i) that the goal of an ideal political community should be the happiness of its citizens and (ii) that happiness is activity is accord with the excellences (aretai) of our rational faculties. Aristotle's misapplication of these two principles leads him to claim that happiness extends only to activity in accordance with moral and intellectual excellence (aretē) and to espouse a colonial political ideal in which a small intellectual and moral elite governs everyone else. The point I make is that, according to another Aristotelian principle, (iii) there are three sorts of rational activity, not just two. In addition to acting (praxis) and scientific thinking (theōria), there is also making (poiēsis). From (ii) and (iii) together, it follows that the activity of making things is a genuine form of happiness. Once this point is acknowledged, Aristotle's political ideal must be expanded to include skilled workers among the full members of the political community as well as those engaged in theoretical and practical activities, that is, in science and government. The ideal that emerges is democratic. Objections to democracy on the grounds that workers are incapable of governing themselves are met, in the ideal case at least, by referring to Aristotle's own argument about the wisdom of the multitude."

Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for David's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 21, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On January 31st, Albert Bergesen will be giving a talk entitled, "The End of the 500-Year Reign of Western Radical Thought," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Albert teaches here at the University of Arizona in the Department of Sociology and has appointments in the School of Government and Public Policy and the McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship in the Eller School of Management. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Albert's talk!

When

Noon to 1:30 p.m. Jan. 31, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On January 17th, Kay Mathiesen will be giving a talk entitled, "Information Rights as Human Rights," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Kay teaches here at the University of Arizona in the School of Information Resources and Library Science. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Kay's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 17, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

Semester

Spring

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On December 4th, Jenann Ismael will be giving a talk as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Jenann is an Associate Professor of Philosophy here at the University of Arizona. Here is an abstract:

There are all kinds of events that are part of my psychological life. I see things and hear things; I get hungry; I feel sad. I have thoughts and ideas, carry out inferences, and make decisions. The stream of events that make up my conscious life is a busy whir of happenings. Which of these are things I do, rather than things that merely happen to me? These are the questions I want to raise. I will suggest that there are certain events in my mental life with respect to which it is impossible to take a passive stance, and that this helps us to understand the sense in which our actions are up to us.

Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Jenann's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Dec. 4, 2012

Academic year

2012-2013

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On November 27th, Gary Pivo will be giving a talk entitled, "Social Responsibility in Property Investing and Development," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Gary teaches here at the University of Arizona in the Planning Degree Program as well as in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Gary's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Nov. 27, 2012

Academic year

2012-2013

 

Freedom Center Colloquium Series

On October 31st, Virgil Storr will be giving a talk entitled, "The Moral Teachings of the Market," as part of the Freedom Center Colloquium Series. Virgil is a Research Associate Professor of Economics at George Mason University, as well as the Don C. Lavoie Research Fellow in the F.A. Hayek Program in Philosophy, Politics and Economics. He is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center and a Research Professor at the Freedom Center. Please join us in the Kendrick Room at the Freedom Center for Virgil's talk!

When

12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Oct. 31, 2012

Academic year

2012-2013

The first Social Philosophy and Policy conference under the new editorial team, entitled New Essays in Moral Philosophy, will take place on January 10-13, 2013 at the Westward Look Resort in Tucson, Arizona.  For more information, please click here.

When

9 a.m. Jan. 10, 2013 to 5 p.m. Jan. 13, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

On April 7, 2013, the Arizona Center for the Philosophy of Freedom hosted a workshop on Jacob Levy's book manuscript, Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom, which will be published by Oxford University Press. Jacob is the Tomlinson Professor of Political Theory at McGill University. His book explores the problematic role in liberal political theory of "intermediate groups" -- associations, churches, cultural groups, local levels of government, universities, and (in a qualified sense) the family. Jacob investigates the ways in which these intermediate groups can allow us to exercise our liberty and also how they can stifle it, suggesting that liberal theorists must ultimately embrace the tensions inherent in the task of finding an acceptable role for intermediate groups in a free society. Comments on the manuscript were delivered in two 90-minute sessions by Samuel Fleischacker and Eric Mack.  For more information about the workshop participants, please follow the links below:

Speaker:
Jacob Levy, McGill University

Commentators:
Samuel Fleischacker, University of Illinois at Chicago
Eric Mack, Tulane University

 

When

2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. April 7, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013

On March 2, 2013, the Arizona Center for the Philosophy of Freedom hosted a workshop on the recent work of Daniel Silvermint, which focuses on oppression, victim agency, and the value of resistance.  Daniel is a GRIPP/RGCS Postdoctoral Fellow at McGill University, as well as a recent alumnus of the University of Arizona (2012).  In the fall, Daniel will be moving into a tenure-track position with the Department of Philosophy at the University of Connecticut, with a joint appointment to the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Comments on the manuscript will be delivered in two 90-minute sessions by Marilyn Friedman and Samantha Brennan.  For more information about the workshop participants, please follow the links below:

Speaker:
Daniel Silvermint, McGill University / University of Connecticut

Commentators:
Marilyn Friedman, Vanderbuilt University
Samantha Brennan, University of Western Ontario
 

Daniel Silvermint  
Samantha Brennan Marilyn Friedman and Daniel Silvermint

When

9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. March 2, 2013

Academic year

2012-2013
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